Sunday, 24 March 2013

My 'interesting reads' roundup (weekly)

  • The Financial Brand loves its Google Alerts, and it is Not Happy that they are broken with no fix in sight. In this information packed post, it sets out why we should all be concerned about the latest Google glitch "Google has lost touch with its core business model: search. Searching the internet is what Google is was known for, it is was what Google (once) did better than everyone else. But Google has become distracted with “Shiny New Syndrome,” wasting tremendous amounts of time and energy (yours and ours) on ideas that fall way outside the search model."
    tags: google
  • Capzles is a user-friendly, free timeline developer. You can enter text and multimedia, and create a flashy timeline in a variety of preset designs. www.capzles.com/ (Caveat - it's Flash-based. Not friendly for iThings) 
  • Andy Carvin's insights into how he builds an online network - really useful tips for any journalist. 
  • WaPo imposes a 20 pages a month limit metered paywall. As (just about every) other commenters have pointed out, this is surely more of a saggy picket fence than a paywall.  "The Post has been the most prominent of the anti-paywall US papers, and the last without one, excepting USA Today (all eyes now are on The Guardian). Its resistance spurred unhelpful commentary like Mathew Ingram’s July 2012 “Why the Washington Post will never have a paywall” piece. “Never,” in this case, turned out to be eight months."
  • "As PR becomes ascendant, private and government interests become more able to generate, filter, distort, and dominate the public debate, and to do so without the public knowing it. "What we are seeing now is the demise of journalism at the same time we have an increasing level of public relations and propaganda," Robert McChesney said. "We are entering a zone that has never been seen before in this country.""
  • From the Guardian. Does what it says on the tin. 
  • The annual PEW report on American journalism is out - and it makes uncomfortable reading if you work in the industry. 
Posted from Diigo. The rest of my favorite links are here.
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